Hallmarking

Hallmarking at Hamilton & Inches

When it comes to manufacturing jewellery and silverware, precious metals (silver, palladium, gold and platinum) are rarely used in their purest form. Instead, they are usually alloyed with lesser metals to achieve the desired strength, durability, and colour.

It is not possible to detect the precious metal content of an item by sight or by touch. It is, therefore, a legal requirement to have items consisting of silver, palladium, gold or platinum independently tested and hallmarked before they can be described and sold as such. Items must bear a hallmark at point of sale, subject to the following weight exemptions:

Silver: mandatory for items above 7.78 grams;
Gold: mandatory for items above 1 gram;
Palladium: mandatory for items above 1 gram;
Platinum: mandatory for items above 0.5 grams.

hallmarking

A History of Hallmarking

Whilst Scotland has been making marks on silver since the 1400s, our hallmarking system takes root in England when, in 1238, the 925 standard was imposed for coinage and domestic pieces. Over the years, in a bid to prevent fraud, makers were required to present pieces for testing at Goldsmiths Hall, hence the term hallmarking.

Whilst there are many types of hallmarks, today they help identify the purity of an item and tell the story about where the piece was made. Three marks are required under adopted European legislation:the Sponsor or Maker’s mark,the European convention mark for fineness and the Assay Office punch. In addition, throughout the UK we still use the traditional fineness mark and date letters.

Whilst Scotland has been making marks on silver since the 1400s, our hallmarking system takes root in England when, in 1238, the 925 standard was imposed for coinage and domestic pieces. Over the years, in a bid to prevent fraud, makers were required to present pieces for testing at Goldsmiths Hall, hence the term hallmarking.

Whilst there are many types of hallmarks, today they help identify the purity of an item and tell the story about where the piece was made. Three marks are required under adopted European legislation:the Sponsor or Maker’s mark,the European convention mark for fineness and the Assay Office punch. In addition, throughout the UK we still use the traditional fineness mark and date letters.

hallmarking

The Edinburgh Assay Office

Hamilton & Inches is registered with the Edinburgh Assay Office, ensuring our precious metal jewellery is compliant with the UK’s hallmarking regulations. All stock is subject to an internal confirmation process to ensure it meets the UK’s hallmarking regulations before it is dispatched and ready for our client.

We are an Assay Assured Jewellery Retailer. Assay Assured status is only given to retailers who have been independently audited and verified by Assay Assured . This is a scheme which is run and overseen by the Edinburgh Assay Office, to ensure that all items made from precious metal (except items exempt by weight) are independently tested and hallmarked.

Hamilton & Inches is registered with the Edinburgh Assay Office, ensuring our precious metal jewellery is compliant with the UK’s hallmarking regulations. All stock is subject to an internal confirmation process to ensure it meets the UK’s hallmarking regulations before it is dispatched and ready for our client.

We are an Assay Assured Jewellery Retailer. Assay Assured status is only given to retailers who have been independently audited and verified by Assay Assured . This is a scheme which is run and overseen by the Edinburgh Assay Office, to ensure that all items made from precious metal (except items exempt by weight) are independently tested and hallmarked.

the edinburgh assay office